Active Projects

MSV4: CFD based evaluation method to improve natural ventilation, environmental performance and maintain health without harm in healthcare spaces

Project Facts

Start date: June 2011
End date: November 2013
Investigators Professor Andrew Price; Dr. Malcolm Cooke
Staff Employed Dr Zulfikar Adamu
Status Complete

Project Partners

• Simul8, SIMUL8 Corporation,
• Assura, Active Plan, MACE, Space Syntax, Integra,
• Arup, Avanti Architects, DLA Freemanwhite,
• Nightingale Associate
• Great Ormand Street Hospital
• NHS Leicestershire and Rutland PCT, NHS Leicester City PCT, NHS Milton Keynes PCT, Southampton PCT

Project Partners

HaCIRIC
Department of Civil and Building Engineering
Loughborough University
Ashby Road
Loughborough
Leicestershire
LE11 3TU
T: +44 (0) 15 0922 2627
E: a.d.f.price@lboro.ac.uk

Natural ventilation presents an opportunity to deliver comfort and acceptable air quality through low-energy simple or advanced techniques, without compromising comfort. However, existing healthcare ventilation standards are lacking in specific guidance on how to utilise natural ventilation strategies for health facilities. Additionally there is a need for standardised healthcare ventilation metrics or indices which are requisites for evaluating the performance of ventilation systems, and their absence can be attributed to prescriptive nature of current guidelines.

MSV4 aimed to develop a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) based evaluation method to improve natural ventilation, environmental performance and maintain health without harm in healthcare spaces.

This research exploited the capabilities of CFD to investigate the use of innovative natural ventilation in hospital wards. The use of natural personalised ventilation (NPV) was shown to be feasible concept in a four-bed ADB ward as well as the four-bed Cruciform ward layout (as proposed by Nightingale Associates). In both spaces, each patient had a dedicated supply of fresh outdoor air delivered directly above them, resulting in a protected zone of diluted and uncontaminated indoor air. The project also utilised CFD to explore a novel bio-mimetic passive heat recovery systems for naturally ventilated wards. This concept is intended for various kinds of healthcare spaces, including wards and offices.